Bless the Lord O my soul — Psalm 101-103

Our mothers always taught us that bad company corrupts good morals, but did you ever really buy it? As it turns out she was right all along. Let’s read.

The righteous don’t associate with evil (Psalm 101) — I know this doesn’t sound too evangelistic, but Christian do need to be careful of their friends and associates. You can’t control who your work colleagues will be. Nor who you buy from at Walmart. But the things in our control should be controlled. Of course be friendly to neighbors, colleagues, etc. — you’ll never win them with the Gospel unless they know you care. But be the leader, the moral influence, the change agent — like Jesus — not “the changed”. David notes that righteousness includes more than staying away from evil deeds, and more than doing good deeds; it also avoids befriending God’s enemies. The NT applies this in withdrawl of fellowship — 1 Cor. 5. Not only does this please God, it keeps sin’s influence out of our lives.

It is time to be gracious to Zion (Psalm 102) — There’s a good chance that this psalm comes at the end of the Babylonian exile. The penitent psalmist asks for deliverance because “it’s time” — probably in connection with Jeremiah’s prophesied 70 years. Since Zion usually is parallel to the church, it might be appropriate to ask if this psalm has meaning for the church? Does the church need delivering grace from it’s own misdeeds? False teachings, materialism, apathy? I hope the time has come. Don’t you?
Thank you!! (Psalm 102) — He hadn’t dealt with us according to our iniquities. Isnt that good news? As far as east from west is how far our sins have been removed from us!! Isn’t that good news? Thanks is due to god more than we can say!!

See you tomorrow, Lord willing.

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About parklinscomb

I'm a minister for the church of Christ in Manchester NH where I've worked since the 1970's. I'm a big fan of my family, archaeology, the Bible, the Lord's church, and Gander Brook Christian Camp.
This entry was posted in Bible commentary, Christianity, Old Testament. Bookmark the permalink.

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